Aster novae-angliae New England Aster Seed and Potted Plants
(AS-ter  NO-vay  ANG-lee-eye)

Symphyotrichum novae-angliae
Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers
Native Perennial Wild Flower Seed and Plants
for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration john@easywildflowers.com

    Aster novae-angliae (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), New England Asters, are beautiful, easy to grow prairie plants prized for their masses of pink to purple flowers with bright yellow centers.  Flowers are 1 to 2 inches in diameter and bloom in September and October.  Wild New England Aster's mounds of pink to royal purple flowers are very attractive to butterflies especially Monarchs.  New England Aster plants grow 2 to 6 feet tall and work well in the background of the fall garden or it can be pinched back several times until midsummer for a stronger, more compact shape.  It prefers average to moist soil and full sun.  
New England Aster seeds need 4 weeks cold moist stratification for germination.
 

aster novae-angliae picture, Symphyotrichum novae-angliae, new england aster picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Photo by cj Sun to Light Shade August and September Pink to Purple 30-72 Average
to Moist
18 to 36 Inches Perennial

click for additional photo     

For other Native Wild Flowers visit the Wildflower Seed and Potted Plant Price List 
 to order print and mail the  order form
or
email questions, comments, and orders to john@easywildflowers.com

We accept payment by check, money order, and through paypal.

New England Aster potted plants are available, $5.00 each plus UPS shipping.
please contact us by email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping costs on potted plants

Aster Novae-angliae seed
New England Aster seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50 + shipping

200 33 sq ft

1 ounce -   email/call for availability

 60,000 1500 sq ft

1 pound - pound quantity not available

 960,000 24,000 sq ft

Minimum combined seed order is $10, this can be a combination of different wildflower seeds
Native
New England aster plants can be used for wildflower gardens, butterfly gardens, roadside plantings, prairie restoration, wildlife cover, prairie landscaping and wetland situations.

New England aster is a native perennial forb which grows from 2 ½ to 6.0 feet tall with hairy stems and leaves.  The alternate leaves are up to 4 inches long and 1 inch wide, with broad, clasping bases and pointed tips.  The individually stalked flower heads are in an open, rounded cluster at the tops of the main stem branches.  The flower stalks and bracts at the base of each flower head are covered with gland-tipped hairs.  Each head is about 1 ½ inches wide, with 40 or more bright purple, petal-like ray flowers surrounding a central yellow disk.  The ray flowers are sometimes pinkish purple or pale lavender in color.  New England aster is the showiest of the genus, and stand out on roadside shoulders and ditches from August through late October

New England aster grows in prairie swales, wet meadows, alluvial soils and thickets, low fields in valleys, and moist ground along streams.  It ranges from Quebec to Alberta, south to North Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico.

Prepare a clean weed free seedbed by disking and harrowing or using chemical weed control.  Firm the seedbed by cultipacking.  Seedbed should be firm enough to allow seed to be planted 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep. The seed of New England aster needs cold stratification for maximum germination if seeded in spring or summer (34-40 degrees Fahrenheit for 30-40 days).  Use a planter that insures proper seeding depth and good seed and soil contact like a brillion roller that is capable of handling and placing seed in a uniform manner.  There are approximately 1,100,000 seeds in a pound of New England aster. 

 Seeding rates for New England aster:

 For seed production:

Solid stand – 40 pure live seed (PLS) in a 36-inch row; - one half pound pure live seed per acre.

 Prairie planting:  mixture – 1 – 5 PLS per square foot (0.04 to 0.20) pound PLS per acre.

 Use no fertilizer the establishment year unless soil test indicates a low deficiency of less than 15 PPM of phosphorus and or less than 90 PPM of potassium.  Use no nitrogen during the establishment year as this can encourage weed competition.

Reduce weed competition by mowing over the height of the New England aster plants or cultivating between the rows.  Use a non- selective contact herbicide while dormant or a pre emergent herbicide to control annuals after the New England aster is established.   Remove dead plant material in the spring for faster green-up by shredding.  Burning of dead plant refuge can weaken the plants unless done before it has broken dormancy.  

The most destructive diseases in the cultivation of asters are various forms of stem-rot.  They are of fungus origin and are induced by allowing the plants to remain moist too long at a time. 

 The infection usually takes place in the seed-row, but often no effect is noticed until the plants are nearly full-grown, when they suddenly wilt and die.  The “yellow disease” causes the plants to have a bleached appearance and to make a spindling growth.  Thorough cultivation of the soil is the best preventive.

 New England aster is not known to invade in areas where this species does not naturally occur.

Aster novae-angliae New England Aster with it's pink and purple masses are found growing wild in wet meadows, prairies, and along streams from Quebec to Alberta, south to North Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico.  Asteraceae (Aster Family)
The map below shows areas where native Aster novae-angliae New England Aster plants grow wild but it can be planted and will grow over a much wider area than shown.  
USDA plant hardiness zones 2 to 8.

Aster novae-angliae
Symphyotrichum novae-angliae
New England Aster

Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky 
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts Michigan
Minnesota

Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey 
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota Tennessee
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Distributional Map for Aster novae-angliae, new england aster native wildflower seed

Alabama
Arkansas

Use the chart below for shipping charges on Aster novae-angliae New England Aster flower seeds
to order copy print and mail the order form
or
email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com

please contact us by email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges on potted plants

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.
 

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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 Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793

USA

Phone 417-469-2611 

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Aster novae-angliae New England Aster Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Names
Aster, starwort, first flower
Uses
New England aster can be used for roadside plantings, prairie restoration, wildlife cover, prairie landscaping and wetland situations.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant‟s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).
Description
New England aster is a native perennial forb which grows from 2 ½ to 6.0 feet tall with hairy stems and leaves. The alternate leaves are up to 4 inches long and 1 inch wide, with broad, clasping bases and pointed tips. The individually stalked flower heads are in an open, rounded cluster at the tops of the main stem branches. The flower stalks and bracts at the base of each flower head are covered with gland-tipped hairs. Each head is about 1 ½ inches wide, with 40 or more bright purple, petal-like ray flowers surrounding a central yellow disk. The ray flowers are sometimes pinkish purple or pale lavender in color. New England aster is the showiest of the genus, and stand out on roadside shoulders and ditches from August through late October
Adaptation and Distribution
New England aster grows in prairie swales, wet meadows, alluvial soils and thickets, low fields in valleys, and moist ground along streams. It ranges from Quebec to Alberta, south to North Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico.
For a current distribution map, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.
Establishment
Prepare a clean weed free seedbed by disking and harrowing or using chemical weed control. Firm the seedbed by cultipacking. Seedbed should be firm enough to allow seed to be planted 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep. The seed of New England aster needs cold stratification for maximum germination if seeded in spring or summer (34-40 degrees Fahrenheit for 30-40 days). Use a planter that insures proper seeding depth and good seed and soil contact like a brillion roller that is capable of handling and placing seed in a uniform manner. There are approximately 1,100,000 seeds in a pound of New England aster.
Seeding rates for New England aster:
For seed production:
Solid stand – 40 pure live seed (PLS) in a
36-inch row; - .53 pounds PLS/acre.
Prairie planting: mixture – 1 – 5 PLS per square foot (0.04 to 0.20) pound PLS per acre.
USDA NRCS Elsberry Plant Materials Center
Use no fertilizer the establishment year unless soil test indicates a low deficiency of less than 15 PPM of phosphorus and or less than 90 PPM of potassium. Use no nitrogen during the establishment year as this can encourage weed competition.
Management
Reduce weed competition by mowing over the height of the New England aster plants or cultivating between the rows. Use a non- selective contact herbicide while dormant or a pre emergent herbicide to control annuals after the New England aster is established. Remove dead plant material in the spring for faster green-up by shredding. Burning of dead plant refuge can weaken the plants unless done before it has broken dormancy.
Pests and Potential Problems
The most destructive diseases in the cultivation of asters are various forms of stem-rot. They are of fungus origin and are induced by allowing the plants to remain moist too long at a time.
The infection usually takes place in the seed-row, but often no effect is noticed until the plants are nearly full-grown, when they suddenly wilt and die. The “yellow disease” causes the plants to have a bleached appearance and to make a spindling growth. Thorough cultivation of the soil is the best preventive.
Environmental Concerns
New England aster is not known to invade in areas where this species does not naturally occur.
Cultivars, Improved, and Selected Materials (and area of origin)
According to the publication entitled „Improved Conservation Plants Materials Released by NRCS and Cooperators through September 2001‟, there are no cultivars, source identified, selected or tested class releases of New England aster from the Plant Materials Program.