Bouteloua curtipendula Sideoats Grama Warm Season Grass
boo-te-LOO-a  kurt-i-PEN-dyu-la

Native Wild Flower Seeds and Potted Plants

Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers
 for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration  john@easywildflowers.com 

bouteloua curtipendula, sideoats grama picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Sun June   20 to 36 Dry to Average 6 to 12 Inches Perennial Grass

Photo by Bill Summers    

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OR 
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john@easywildflowers.com  
 

Bouteloua curtipendula Sideoats Grama potted plants are available $5.00 each plus Boxing/Shipping

email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges on native wildflower potted plants.

Bouteloua curtipendula
Sideoats Grama

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50 + shipping

150

 sq ft

1 ounce - --$3.50

7,000 

233 sq ft

1 pound --$25.00

 112,000

3,733 sq ft

Some grass seeds are very bulky
please email for shipping charges on ounce and pound quantities of grass seed.

Bouteloua = Named for Claudio and Esteban Boutelou, 19th century Spanish brothers and gardener
curtipendula = short pendant

Bouteloua curtipendula, Sideoats Grama is a  small clump forming native grass with delicately showy  reddish orange stems with 2 rows of small flowers mostly on one side. The basal leaves are 1/4 inches wide and 12 inches long.  It is best when planted in dry to average soil with rock garden and prairie wildflowers.

Uses

Erosion Control: This grass is adapted to most soil conditions.  Successful seedings are obtained in rocky, stony, or shallow soils.  It is a fair to good erosion control plant when mixed with the other plants naturally associated with it.

  Grazing: This is one of the most important range grasses.  Although not as palatable as some of the smaller gramas, e.g. blue grama, it is more palatable than many of the other grass species.  It produces a much greater volume of forage than blue grama, and this tends to make up for its slightly lower palatability.  It remains green later in the fall and usually begins growth in the spring before other gramas.  It cures well, and maintains a fairly high feeding value throughout the year.

  Wildlife: Furnishes some forage for deer and antelope when green.  Elk use this plant throughout the year.

  Description

Bouteloua curtipendula, sideoats grama, is a medium-size perennial bunchgrass, 15 to 30 inches tall or occasionally taller.  This is the largest and most coarse of the grama grasses.  It has a bluish-green color, sometimes with a purplish cast (especially in the spring), and cures to a reddish-brown or straw color.  Leaves are coarser than other species of gramas, straight, comparatively stiff, and mostly basal.  Ten to thirty small, non-comb-like spikes are borne mostly along one side of each central seed stalk.  These spikes drop when mature, leaving a long zigzag stalk.

Adaptation and Distribution

Sideoats grama is found on rocky open slopes, woodlands, and forest openings up to an elevation of about 7,000 feet.

Establishment

Seeding of improved strains of this grass is accomplished by drilling in firm, weed-free seedbeds at the rate of 2-1/2 to 5 pounds (or more) pure live seed per acre.  Protect from grazing from date of seeding through the second growing season.  Seedings should be delayed until good soil moisture is present.

Management

Sideoats grama is not as resistant to grazing as blue grama because of its taller growth habit, but sideoats grama stays green longer and can be grazed for a longer period.  Reduced forage production, carrying capacity, and loss in cattle weight is a direct result of overgrazing.  Sideoats grama is a normal component of a large number of range sites.  The grass lengthens the grazing season and increases forage production, in addition to providing variety in the feed.  Sideoats grama will return to most ranges under good management.  Practices that will bring the grass back include proper grazing use, planned grazing systems, and brush control.

There are no serious pests of sideoats grama.

Native sideoats Grama occurs naturally in limestone glades, upland prairies, and savannas in the U.S. and adjacent Canada and Mexico. Gramineae (Grass Family)

Sideoats grama is distributed throughout most of the United States.  The map below shows areas where native warm season grass Sideoats Grama plants grows wild.  

Bouteloua curtipendula
Sideoats Grama

Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine

Maryland
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Dakota
Ohio

Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Distributional Map for Bouteloua curtipendula, sideoats grama wild flower seed

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
California

Use the chart below for shipping charges on native wildflower seeds

to order copy and mail the order form
OR
 email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com 

please email for shipping charges on ounce or pound quantities of grass seed.

Please contact us by email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges and availability on  potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

email for the correct shipping amount on orders containing ounce and pound quantities of grass seed

The shipping amounts below are for flower seeds and small packets of grass seed
 

please email for shipping charges on ounce or pound quantities of grass seed.

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
USA
Phone 417-469-2611 

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e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Livestock: Sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula [Michx.] Torr. var. caespitosa Gould and Kapadia) produces abundant forage on many range sites. It provides moderate to high quality forage for all types of grazing livestock. Wildlife: Sideoats grama provides fair forage for wildlife. It also provides good nesting cover for upland game birds and escape cover for all wildlife. Status Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s
current status (e.g., threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values). Description General: Sideoats grama is a native, warm-season perennial bunchgrass. It grows 3-4 feet tall. The leaf blade is long, and is distinguished by papilla based hairs along the margin. Variety caespitosa does not have rhizomes, and has an upright, caespitose growth form. The seedheads are numerous spikes with 10-30 spikelets generally oriented to one side of the rachis (Barkworth et al. 2007). Distribution: The natural range of sideoats grama is throughout North America and continuing down into Central America. Variety caespitosa is generally found in the western portions of the species’ range. For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site. Adaptation Sideoats grama grows best on fine to medium textured soils.
Establishment Seedbed preparation should begin well in advance of planting. Planting can be scheduled for early spring or later summer-autumn. Establish a clean, weed-free seedbed by either tillage or herbicides. Prior to planting, the site should be firm and have accumulated soil moisture. Sideoats grama is best seeded using a native-grass drill with picker wheels or medium to large seed box to ensure a good planting of the seed. Broadcast seeding may be used in areas not easily planted with a drill, but some type of additional coverage such as culti-packing or light dragging will be beneficial to ensure good seed to soil contact. Seed should be planted 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep. It is better to plant too shallow than too deep. If one plant per square foot has become established in field plantings, then the seeding can be considered successful. Management Sideoats grama should not be grazed the first year after planting. After a stand is established, either continuous or rotational grazing can be used. It is recommended that a minimum 6 inch stubble height be maintained under continuous grazing. Contact your local USDA-NRCS field office for assistance in
planning and applying prescribed grazing. Plants should be allowed to produce seed annually to insure stand health. Sideoats grama is a long-lived
perennial that is extremely drought and fire tolerant ‘Butte’ was selected at Nebraska AES, Lincoln, once established. USDA-ARS and SCS cooperatively by E.C. Conard and L.C. Newell. It represents native collections from Pests and Potential Problems Holt and Platte Counties in Nebraska that were Thrips and rice stink bugs can limit seed production combined and tested as Nebraska 37. Repeated field on seed production fields. plantings revealed superior germination and establishment characteristics when compared with Environmental Concerns other sources. There are no known environmental concerns associated with sideoats grama. ‘El Reno’ was released cooperatively in 1944 by the SCS, Manhattan, Kansas Plant Materials Center and Seeds and Plant Production Kansas AES. The original seed was collected in a Seed increase plots have been managed on 36” field location near El Reno, Oklahoma in 1934. The bedded rows, however flat plantings may be possible material was outstanding for leafiness, forage with adequate weed control. Sideoats grama can also production and vigor. It also ranked well for disease be established with vegetative transplants. Rapid resistance, seed production, and winter hardiness. It spread and growth has been observed in transplant is widely used in range seedings and is adapted to established stands providing seed harvests within the Kansas, Oklahoma and northern Texas. first year. Furthermore transplants facilitate better weed control in the seed production fields. Deep soil ‘Haskell’ was released in 1983 by the James E. tillage or frequent close cultivation is recommended “Bud” Smith Plant Materials Center, Texas AES and to promote seed production. USDA-ARS. The seed for this release was originally collected in 1960 by J.C. Yeary, Jr. in Haskell, Texas. Seed can be harvested with a Flail-Vac or combine. It was selected based on rhizome production and To clean stems and chaff from harvests, a Clipper adaptation as far south as the Rio Grande Valley in seed cleaner has been used. Sideoats grama can Texas. It is also known for its high forage palatability produce multiple seed crops per year when grown in and prolific seed production. cultivation. The quantity and quality of seed harvests vary greatly depending on location and field Killdeer was informally released in the late 1960’s by conditions. the Bismarck Plant Materials Center in Bismarck, ND. It is composed of seed collected from native Cultivars, Improved, and Selected Materials (and stands in 1956 near Bowman, Bowman County and area of origin) Killdeer, Dunn County, North Dakota. Killdeer possesses outstanding vigor, leafiness, fair seed South Texas Germplasm sideoats grama was released production, freedom from disease and persistence in
by South Texas Natives, the E. “Kika” de la Garza a cold, semi-arid environment. Plant Materials Center, and Texas AgriLife Research Beeville in 2012. It was selected for its survivability, ‘Niner’ was released in 1984 by SCS and the New plant vigor, forage production and seed production Mexico and Colorado AES. The original seed for the characteristics. This germplasm is known to be release was collected by G.C. Niner and J.A. adapted to the Rio Grande Plain, Gulf Coast Prairies Anderson in 1957 west of Socorro, New Mexico. and Marshes, and Coastal Sand Plains Ecoregions of Niner was a bulk increase of the collection made by south Texas. Niner and Anderson. For calibration purposes, South Texas Germplasm Pierre was informally released in 1961 by the contains approximately 165,000 seeds per bulk Bismarck Plant Materials Center and the South pound. A seeding rate of 5-10 pounds of pure live Dakota AES. The original seed for the release was seed (PLS) per acre is recommended. In planting collected in 1954 in Stanley County west of Pierre, mixtures reduce the rate according to the percent of South Dakota. The release is described as outstanding sideoats grama desired on the planting site. Breeder in vigor, leafiness, freedom from disease, seedling seed is maintained by South Texas Natives. vigor and persistence in a semi-arid environment. Well managed seed fields of South Texas Germplasm ‘Premier’ was released in 1960 cooperatively by have produced 80-350 bulk pounds of clean seed per Texas AES and USDA-ARS and NRCS. The original year. Purity of the seed is usually around 50% and seed was collected in 1953 from a single plant germination rates range from 5-20%. South Texas growing between Cuauhtemoc and Chichuahua, Germplasm has a large amount of dormant seed. It Mexico. The release is described as having good
produces four seed crops per year when grown under irrigation in South Texas.
seedling vigor, good seed yield, drought tolerance, upright growth form and leafiness.
‘Trailway’ was cooperatively released in 1958 by Nebraska AES and USDA-ARS. The original seed was collected in 1953 in northern Holt County by L.C. Newell. The release is described as winter hardy, long lived, late maturing with a somewhat indeterminate heading and flowering response. Requires most of the growing season to mature a crop in eastern Nebraska and may fail to produce seed in areas with a shorter growing season.
‘Vaughn’ was released in 1940 by the New Mexico AES and SCS Plant Science Division. The original seed was collected from native stands in 1935 near Vaughn, New Mexico. The release is described as slightly variable, but all have erect leaves, good seedling vigor and easy to establish.
Northern, Central and Southern Iowa Germplasms were released in 1995 as source identified releases, by the Elsberry Plant Materials Center, University of Northern Iowa, Iowa Department of Transportation, Iowa Crop Improvement Association and NRVC. They are all composite lines from collections made in Northern, Central and Southern Iowa.
References Barkworth, M.E., L.K. Anderton, K.M. Capels, S. Long, and M.B. Piep. 2007. Manual of Grasses for North America. Intermountain Herbarium and Utah State University Press. Logan, UT. SCS 1983. Notice of Release of ‘Haskell’ sideoats grama. United States Department of Agriculture. Washington, D.C. SCS 1984. Notice of Release of ‘Niner’ sideoats grama. United States Department of Agriculture. Washington, D.C.

 

Uses
Erosion Control: This grass is adapted to most soil conditions. Successful seedings are obtained in rocky, stony, or shallow soils. It is a fair to good erosion control plant when mixed with the other plants naturally associated with it.
Grazing: This is one of the most important range grasses. Although not as palatable as some of the smaller gramas, e.g. blue grama, it is more palatable than many of the other grass species. It produces a much greater volume of forage than blue grama, and this tends to make up for its slightly lower palatability. It remains green later in the fall and usually begins growth in the spring before other gramas. It cures well, and maintains a fairly high feeding value throughout the year.
Wildlife: Furnishes some forage for deer and antelope when green. Elk use this plant throughout the year.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values). It is considered threatened in several states.
Description
Bouteloua curtipendula, sideoats grama, is a medium-size perennial bunchgrass, 15 to 30 inches tall or occasionally taller. This is the largest and most coarse of the grama grasses. It has a bluish-green color, sometimes with a purplish cast (especially in the spring), and cures to a reddish-brown or straw color. Leaves are coarser than other species of gramas, straight, comparatively stiff, and mostly basal. Ten to thirty small, non-comb-like spikes are borne mostly along one side of each central seed stalk. These spikes drop when mature, leaving a long zigzag stalk.
Adaptation and Distribution
Sideoats grama is found on rocky open slopes, woodlands, and forest openings up to an elevation of about 7,000 feet.
Sideoats grama is distributed throughout most of the United States. For a current distribution map, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Website.
Establishment
Seeding of improved strains of this grass is accomplished by drilling in firm, weed-free seedbeds at the rate of 2-1/2 to 5 pounds (or more) pure live seed per acre. Protect from grazing from date of seeding through the second growing season. Seedings should be delayed until good soil moisture is present.
Management
Sideoats grama is not as resistant to grazing as blue grama because of its taller growth habit, but sideoats grama stays green longer and can be grazed for a longer period. Reduced forage production, carrying capacity, and loss in cattle weight is a direct result of overgrazing. Sideoats grama is a normal component of a large number of range sites. The grass lengthens
© W. L. Wagner
Smithsonian Institution
@USDA NRCS PLANTS
the grazing season and increases forage production, in addition to providing variety in the feed. Sideoats grama will return to most ranges under good management. Practices that will bring the grass back include proper grazing use, planned grazing systems