Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover - Roundhead Lespedeza
(less-pe-DEEZ-uh  cap-i-TAY-tah)

Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers Native Wild Flower Seed and Potted Plants
 for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration john@easywildflowers.com

Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover seed head Photo by cj Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
les.ca1.jpg (37186 bytes) Sun to Light Shade July, August, September Creamy White 30 to 48 Inches Average 12 to 24 Inches Perennial

        For our other native wildflowers visit the Wildflower Seed and Potted Plant Price List 

to order copy and mail the order form
or 
email questions, comments, and orders to 
john@easywildflowers.com

Lespedeza capitata Roundhead Bushclover potted plants (NOT AVAILABLE at this time)
$5 each plus UPS shipping.  Please contact us by email with your address for shipping cost on potted plants

Seeds are Available

Lespedeza capitata seed
Round-headed Bushclover seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $ 2.50

75

 sq ft

1 ounce -   $15.00

  7,500

 sq ft

1 pound -----------

  120,000

 sq ft

Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover, the creamy white flowers of Round-Headed Bush Clover form dense rounded heads 1.5 inches in diameter on 2 to 4 feet tall plants with silvery foliage.  The tan colored seed heads are attractive in winter and are used in both dry and fresh flower arrangements.  Native Roundhead bushclover seeds are eaten by songbirds, Bobwhite quail and other game.  Lespedeza capitata plants were used medicinally by native Americans.  Roundhead bushcolver is accented well when planted in the prairie meadow with Aster, Coreopsis, Echinacea (Coneflower), and Liatris (Blazing Stars). 

The dried seed heads of Lespedeza capitata Roundhead Bushclover are attractive additions to dried flower arrangements.

Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover seeds will germinate quicker if they are scarified before planting.  Rub the seeds between two sheets of coarse sandpaper, this will scratch or rough th hard shell and let water penetrate.

Native Roundhead Lespedeza plants occur naturally in prairies, savannas, woodlands, glades and river bottoms from Maine and Quebec to Minnesota and Nebraska, south to North Carolina and Missouri.   Fabaceae (Bean Family)  

The map below shows areas where native Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover capitata plants grow wild but it can be planted and will grow over a much wider area than shown.  USDA plant hardiness zones 3 to 9.

Lespedeza capitata
Roundhead Bushclover

Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana

Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina

Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin

State Distributional Map for LECA8

Use the chart below for shipping charges on our native wildflower seeds
and Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover flower seeds, to order copy and mail the order form
or
email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com 

Please contact us by email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges and availability on potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.
 

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
USA
Phone 417-469-2611 

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Lespedeza capitata Round-headed Bushclover Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Alternate Names
roundheaded bush clover, bushclover
Uses
Ethnobotanic: The Omaha and Ponca used the stems for a moxa to treat cases of neuralgia and rheumatism. The Comanche boiled the leaves for a beverage tea. The Meskwaki used the root as an antidote for poison. The Iroquois used the whole plant of Lespedeza (unidentified to species level) in combination with Euonymus obovata for stricture caused by something wrong with the blood.
Wildlife: Roundhead lespedeza seeds are an
important food source for the bobwhite quail.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plantís current status, such as, state noxious status and wetland indicator values.
Description
General: Bean Family (Fabaceae). This herbaceous, native, perennial has erect stems that are 6-15 dm, and simple and branched above. The petioles are 2-5 mm, shorter than the stalk of the terminal leaflet. The plant has numerous small trifoliolate leaves. The leaflets are 4.5 x 1.8 cm, variable in shape and pubescence. The flowers are ochroleucous and are arranged in spikes or heads. The calyx lobes are all separate and the wings exceed the keel. Each flower is subtended at the base by small bractlets. The fruits are indehiscent, and 1-seeded.
Distribution: For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site. This plant is found in dry, open woods, sand dunes, and prairies. It ranges from Maine and southern Quebec to Minnesota and South Dakota, south to Georgia, west Florida, and Texas.
Establishment
Propagation by seeds: Clean the seed and scarify each seed coat with sandpaper. If you are storing the seeds before planting, put them in cold storage. Plant the seeds in a bedding mix with a light layer of vermiculite on top. Sow the seeds in flats and water them, keeping them moist. Do not over water them. The seeds will germinate in approximately two weeks. After two more weeks, the seedlings will be ready to transplant into plugs. These plants can be transplanted once again in several weeks to larger pots. In the middle of May, after the danger of frost has past, the plugs can be directly transplanted into a well-drained soil in full sunlight and watered. Make sure the plants are moist for several weeks until established.
Cultivars, Improved and Selected Materials (and area of origin)
LECA8 is available through selected native plant nurseries within its range. Please check the Vendor Database, expected to be on-line through the

Uses

Ethnobotanic: The Omaha and Ponca used the stems for a moxa to treat cases of neuralgia and rheumatism.  The Comanche boiled the leaves for a beverage tea.  The Meskwaki used the root as an antidote for poison.  The Iroquois used the whole plant of Lespedeza (unidentified to species level) in combination with Euonymus obovata for stricture caused by something wrong with the blood.

 

Wildlife: Roundhead lespedeza seeds are an important food source for the bobwhite quail.

 

Description

General: Bean Family (Fabaceae).  This herbaceous, native, perennial has erect stems that are 6-15 dm, and simple and branched above.  The petioles are 2-5 mm, shorter than the stalk of the terminal leaflet.  The plant has numerous small trifoliolate leaves.  The leaflets are 4.5 x 1.8 cm, variable in shape and pubescence.  The flowers are ochroleucous and are arranged in spikes or heads.  The calyx lobes are all separate and the wings exceed the keel.  Each flower is subtended at the base by small bractlets.  The fruits are indehiscent, and 1-seeded. 

 

Distribution: This plant is found in dry, open woods, sand dunes, and prairies.  It ranges from Maine and southern Quebec to Minnesota and South Dakota, south to Georgia, west Florida, and Texas.

 

Establishment

Propagation by seeds: Clean the seed and scarify each seed coat with sandpaper.  If you are storing the seeds before planting, put them in cold storage.  Plant the seeds in a bedding mix with a light layer of vermiculite on top.  Sow the seeds in flats and water them, keeping them moist.  Do not over water them.   The seeds will germinate in approximately two weeks. After two more weeks, the seedlings will be ready to transplant into plugs.  These plants can be transplanted once again in several weeks to larger pots.  In the middle of May, after the danger of frost has past, the plugs can be directly transplanted into a well-drained soil in full sunlight and watered.  Make sure the plants are moist for several weeks until established.