Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Beebalm Seeds and Potted Plants
mon-NAR-duh  fist-you-LOW-suh

Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers Seeds and Potted Plants
for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration john@easywildflowers.com

Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Beebalm Photo by cj

Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Monarda fistulosa picture, wild bergamot picture Sun to Light Shade June and July Lavender 36 to 60 Inches Average 24 to 36 Inches Perennial

For our other native wildflowers visit Wildflower Seed and Potted Plant Price List 

 to order copy and mail the order form
or 
email questions, comments, and orders to
john@easywildflowers.com  

Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Potted plants are $5.00 each plus Boxing/Shipping

email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping costs on potted plants

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal.

Monarda fistulosa
Wild Bergamot

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50

300

40 sq ft

1 ounce -   $18.00    

75,000 

1800 sq ft

1 pound - ------          

  1,200,000

28,800 sq ft

Monarda fistulosa, Wild Bergamot or Beebalm, is a pleasantly scented member of the mint family growing up to 5 feet tall with rose-purple to lavender flowers.  Native Wild Bergamot is a fragrant herbal tea when 3 to 4 dried or fresh leaves are placed in a cup of boiling water with honey. Monarda fistulosa has been used medicinally as a stimulant to remove the pain of colic.  Wild Bergamot flowers do best when planted in average to rich soil in the back border of a butterfly garden or a prairie meadow with Liatris (Blazing Star), Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan), Echinacea (Coneflowers), and Little Bluestem grass.  Monarda fistulosa wildflowers bloom over a 4 week period from late May to August.  

Wild Bergamot seeds are very small and no pretreatment is needed for germination. 

Native Wild Bergamot occurs naturally in prairies, open and dry rocky woods, roadsides, and borders of glades from Maine to Saskatchewan, south to Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.  Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

The map below shows areas where this plant native Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Beebalm  wild flower plants grow wild but they can be planted and will grow over a wider area than shown.  USDA plant hardiness zones 3 to 9. 

Monarda fistulosa
Wild Bergamot

Connecticut
Delaware
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan

Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Distributional Map for Monarda fistulosa, wild bergamot wild flower seed

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
Colorado

Use the chart below for shipping charges on Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Beebalm flower seeds

 to order copy and mail the order form
or
email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com 

Please contact us by email with your address for shipping charges and availability on potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
USA
Phone 417-469-2611 

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Beebalm Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternative Names
Bee-balm
Use
Ethnobotanic: The Tewa Indians because of the flavor it imparted cooked Wild bergamot with meat. The Iroquois used the plant in the making of a beverage. The plant has a wide variety of medicinal uses. The Ojibwe put a wad of chewed leaves of this plant into their nostrils to relieve headache. The tops of the plant were dried and used as a sternutatory for the relief of colds. The leaves were placed in warm water baths for babies. The Flambeau Ojibwe gathered and dried the whole plant, boiling it in a vessel to obtain the volatile oil to inhale to cure catarrh and bronchial affections. The Menomini also used this plant as a remedy for catarrh, steeping the leaves and inflorescences in a tea. The Meskwaki used this plant in combination with other plants to relieve colds. The Hocak (Winnebago) used wild bergamot in their sweat bath and inhaled the fumes to cure colds. A decoction of boiled leaves was used as a cure for eruptions on the face. The Cherokee made a warm poultice of the plant to relieve a headache. The Teton Dakota boiled together the leaves and flowers as a cure for abdominal pains. The Blackfoot made a tea from the blossoms and leaves to cure stomach pains. They also applied boiled leaves to the pustules of acne. The Tewa dried the plant and ground it into a powder that was rubbed over the head to cure headaches, over the body to cure fever, and as a remedy for sore eyes and colds. Early white settlers used it as a diaphoretic and carminative, and occasionally employed it for the relief of flatulent colic, nausea and vomiting.
Economic: Wild bergamot is used in flower arrangements. Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds use the plant for nectar.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status, such as, state noxious status and wetland indicator values.
Description
General: Mint Family (Lamiaceae). This aromatic herbaceous perennial is 5 to 12 dm. high and has branched, hairy stems and spreads by seeds and rhizomes. The opposite leaves are distinctly petioled and deltoid-lanceolate to lanceolate and slightly toothed. Wild bergamot has square stems with gray-green foliage. The flowers bloom from June to September. They are solitary and terminal on the flowering branches and the two stamens surpass the upper lip. The flowers are tubular, 13-15 nerved, with lobes much shorter than the tube. The corolla is lavender and strongly bilabiate. The upper lip is narrow, entire, and softly pubescent while the lower lip is broader.
Distribution
This plant is found in upland woods, thickets, and prairies from Quebec to Manitoba and British Columbia south to Georgia, Louisiana, and Arizona. For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.
W.L.Wagner
Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany
@PLANTS
Establishment
General: When the seeds are ripe, cut off the seed heads and spread them over a clean, dry surface indoors to air-dry for several days. Then place some of the seed heads in a paper bag and shake. Many of the seeds will fall into the bag. Repeat the process with the remaining heads. Next run the seeds and associated chaff through a sieve. Store the seeds in a dry sealed and labeled container or ziploc bag with wet sand or peat moss in the refrigerator that is kept under 40 degrees F for three months.
Propagation by seeds: Sow seeds in flats during January and stored in a greenhouse are expected to germinate in one to two weeks. The soil mix can be one-third sand and two-thirds commercial plug mix. Apply a starter fertilizer solution for the seedlings. Water flats when the soil surface is dry to the touch. Keep the seedlings in the flats for 6-7 weeks, and then transplant them to 3-inch pots. Continue to water seedlings when the surface is dry to the touch. Pinch off the tops of the plants several times during the growing season to encourage branching and bushier grow habit. Apply a weekly application of an all-purpose fertilizer for the transplants. When the roots fill the container (about 2 months) they are ready for outplanting in the garden.
Plant seedlings in a sunny, weed-free well-drained soil, one and one-half to two feet apart. Water, until rains come.
Seeds can also be broadcast on a weed-free surface from January to mid-May in sunny locations. Once the seeds germinate seedlings should be watered during extended dry period. During the first summer of full growth mow the area 3 to 5 times to keep the plants between 8 and 4 inches tall. Mowing also reduces weeds.
Propagation by cuttings: Take stem tip cuttings, 3-4 inches long, any time from May to August. Remove the lower leaves and all flower or seed heads and insert the stems into a sand and perlite-rooting medium. Bury each cutting up to the first node. Place the cuttings in an enclosed area and mist them several times a day. In 4 to 5 weeks the cuttings should be well rooted and can be transplanted to pots. Then outplant the plants in the garden in the early autumn.
Management
Once established, wild bergamot still benefits from extra watering during dry summers. Continue mowing the area, once a year, after the hardest killing frosts or the following spring. This keeps woody plants from encroaching and removes plants that have died back. Since the plant spreads by rhizomes, it can get aggressive. The plant can be kept from spreading by divisions. Division of large plants every 2 to 3 years also keeps them healthy. Mature clumps can be divided in March before they send up stems. Dig up a portion of the clump and divide it into sections. Replant and water the divisions promptly. Continue to add leaf mold and compost to your soil, as the plant's shallow root systems spread easily through light soil.
Cultivars, Improved and Selected Materials (and area of origin)
Seeds and plants of selected wild bergamot are available from many nurseries. It is best to plant species from your local area, adapted to the specific site conditions where the plants are to be grown. Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”

USE - Ethnobotanic: The Tewa Indians because of the flavor it imparted cooked Wild bergamot with meat.  The Iroquois used the plant in the making of a beverage.  The plant has a wide variety of medicinal uses.  The Ojibwe put a wad of chewed leaves of this plant into their nostrils to relieve headache.  The tops of the plant were dried and used as a sternutatory for the relief of colds.  The leaves were placed in warm water baths for babies.  The Flambeau Ojibwe gathered and dried the whole plant, boiling it in a vessel to obtain the volatile oil to inhale to cure catarrh and bronchial affections.  The Menomini also used this plant as a remedy for catarrh, steeping the leaves and inflorescences in a tea.  The Meskwaki used this plant in combination with other plants to relieve colds.  The Hocak (Winnebago) used wild bergamot in their sweat bath and inhaled the fumes to cure colds.  A decoction of boiled leaves was used as a cure for eruptions on the face.  The Cherokee made a warm poultice of the plant to relieve a headache.  The Teton Dakota boiled together the leaves and flowers as a cure for abdominal pains.  The Blackfoot made a tea from the blossoms and leaves to cure stomach pains.  They also applied boiled leaves to the pustules of acne.  The Tewa dried the plant and ground it into a powder that was rubbed over the head to cure headaches, over the body to cure fever, and as a remedy for sore eyes and colds.  Early white settlers used it as a diaphoretic and carminative, and occasionally employed it for the relief of flatulent colic, nausea and vomiting.   

Economic: Wild bergamot is used in flower arrangements.  Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds use the plant for nectar.

 Description- General: Mint Family (Lamiaceae).  This aromatic herbaceous perennial is 5 to 12 dm. high and has branched, hairy stems and spreads by seeds and rhizomes.  The opposite leaves are distinctly petioled and deltoid-lanceolate to lanceolate and slightly toothed.  Wild bergamot has square stems with gray-green foliage.  The flowers bloom from June to September.  They are solitary and terminal on the flowering branches and the two stamens surpass the upper lip.  The flowers are tubular, 13-15 nerved, with lobes much shorter than the tube.  The corolla is lavender and strongly bilabiate.  The upper lip is narrow, entire, and softly pubescent while the lower lip is broader. 

Distribution - This plant is found in upland woods, thickets, and prairies from Quebec to Manitoba and British Columbia south to Georgia, Louisiana, and Arizona.  For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.

Establishment - General: When the seeds are ripe, cut off the seed heads and spread them over a clean, dry surface indoors to air-dry for several days.  Then place some of the seed heads in a paper bag and shake.  Many of the seeds will fall into the bag.  Repeat the process with the remaining heads.  Next run the seeds and associated chaff through a sieve.  Store the seeds in a dry sealed and labeled container or ziploc bag with wet sand or peat moss in the refrigerator that is kept under 40 degrees F for three months.
     Propagation by seeds: Sow seeds in flats during January and stored in a greenhouse are expected to germinate in one to two weeks.  The soil mix can be one-third sand and two-thirds commercial plug mix.  Apply a starter fertilizer solution for the seedlings.  Water flats when the soil surface is dry to the touch.  Keep the seedlings in the flats for 6-7 weeks, and then transplant them to 3-inch pots.  Continue to water seedlings when the surface is dry to the touch.  Pinch off the tops of the plants several times during the growing season to encourage branching and bushier grow habit.  Apply a weekly application of an all-purpose fertilizer for the transplants.  When the roots fill the container (about 2 months) they are ready for outplanting in the garden.  Plant seedlings in a sunny, weed-free well-drained soil, one and one-half to two feet apart.  Water, until rains come.
     Seeds can also be broadcast on a weed-free surface from January to mid-May in sunny locations.  Once the seeds germinate seedlings should be watered during extended dry period.  During the first summer of full growth mow the area 3 to 5 times to keep the plants between 8 and 4 inches tall.  Mowing also reduces weeds.
     Propagation by cuttings: Take stem tip cuttings, 3-4 inches long, any time from May to August.  Remove the lower leaves and all flower or seed heads and insert the stems into a sand and perlite-rooting medium.  Bury each cutting up to the first node.  Place the cuttings in an enclosed area and mist them several times a day.  In 4 to 5 weeks the cuttings should be well rooted and can be transplanted to pots.  Then outplant the plants in the garden in the early autumn.

Management - Once established, wild bergamot still benefits from extra watering during dry summers.  Continue mowing the area, once a year, after the hardest killing frosts or the following spring.  This keeps woody plants from encroaching and removes plants that have died back.  Since the plant spreads by rhizomes, it can get aggressive.  The plant can be kept from spreading by divisions.  Division of large plants every 2 to 3 years also keeps them healthy.  Mature clumps can be divided in March before they send up stems.  Dig up a portion of the clump and divide it