Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine American Feverfew Seeds and Plants
par-THEN-ee-um   in-teg-ree-FOH-lee-um

 Native Wildflower

Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers Seeds and Potted Plants
Native Perennial Wild Flowers for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration john@easywildflowers.com

  Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Feverfew flower picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Feverfew flower picture Parthenium integrifolium picture, Wild Quinine picture, American feverfew picture Sun to Light Shade June and July White 24 to 36 Inches Dry to Average 16 to 24  Inches Perennial

Parthenium integrifolium, Wild Quinine, American Feverfew Photo by CJ.  Click on picture for large image     

For our other native wildflowers visit Wildflower Seed and Potted Plant Price List 
 to order copy and mail the order form
or 
email questions, comments, and orders to john@easywildflowers.com  


Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine Feverfew potted plants are available $5.00 each plus Boxing/Shipping

email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping costs on potted plants.

Parthenium integrifolium seed
Wild Quinine seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50 + shipping

 50

20 sq ft

1 ounce - ---------

 6790

335 sq ft

1 pound -----------

 108,640

5,360 sq ft

Seed shipping chart at bottom of page
Parthenium integrifolium
, Wild Quinine or American Feverfew has small white flowers in flat-topped clusters on 3 feet tall stems.  Wild Quinine flowers bloom for 3 to 4 weeks during June to August and grows best when planted in average garden soil in full sun to light shade.  Wild Quinine is beautiful when naturalized in a prairie meadow with Echinacea (Coneflowers), Ratibida (prairie coneflower),  and Liatris (Blazing Star).  It also has been used medicinally.

Parthenium integrifolium, Wild Quinine, American Feverfew seed germination is improved after a pretreatment of 4 to 6  weeks of cold moist stratification or when planted outside in the fall or early winter for spring germination.

Native Parthenium integrifolium is a tantalizing flower occurring naturally on prairies, glades, and rocky open woods from Georgia to Texas, north to New York, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and introduced in Massachusetts.   Asteraceae (Aster Family)

The map below shows areas where native Wild Quinine plants grow wild but it can be planted and will grow over a much wider area than shown.  USDA plant hardiness zones 3 to 9. 

Parthenium integrifolium
Wild Quinine Plants

Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky

Louisiana
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
New York
North Carolina

Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin

State Distributional Map for Parthenium integrifolium, wild quinine wild flower seed

Use the chart below for shipping charges on our native wildflower seeds Parthenium integrifolium, Wild Quinine, American Feverfew flower seeds

to order copy and mail the order form
or
email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com 

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
USA
Phone 417-469-2611 

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Parthenium integrifolium, Wild Quinine, American Feverfew Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alternate Names
American feverfew, eastern feverfew, eastern parthenium
Uses
Ethnobotanic: The Catawba and other tribes in the southeastern United States used wild quinine for medicinal and veterinary purposes. The leaves contain tannin, which is thought to be beneficial for treating burns. The leaves were mashed into a moist, thick paste, which was then applied as a poultice to burns. Burns were also treated by placing the whole, fresh leaves over the wounded area. Tea from the boiled roots was used to treat dysentery. Ashes from burned leaves were used to rub the skin of horses suffering from sore backs.
Other: The flowers make long-lasting additions to cut bouquets.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).
Weediness
This plant may become weedy or invasive in some regions or habitats and may displace desirable vegetation if not properly managed. Please consult with your local NRCS Field Office, Cooperative Extension Service office, or state natural resource or agricultural department regarding its status and use. Weed information is also available from the PLANTS Web site.
Description
General: Sunflower Family (Asteraceae). Wild quinine is a perennial, herbaceous forb. Stiff, upright, sometimes hairy stems are single, or branched near the top. Stems (4-12 dm in height) grow from a swollen tuberous root. The leaves are ovate to lanceolate with wavy, toothed margins. Basal leaves are 38 cm long. Stem leaves are alternate, smaller, and sparsely distributed along the stems. The long-lasting, somewhat-yarrow-like flower heads are composed of grayish-white, globular, compound flowers that are 4-6 mm wide. Five, unusually short, ray flowers (1-2mm long) surround the central disk flower corollas, which are 2.5-3 mm long. Only the ray flowers are fertile. The heads are grouped together into an inflorescent spray up to 20 cm in diameter. Flowers have a pleasant but mild medicinal fragrance. The plant flowers from summer through the autumn months.
Distribution: For current distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.
Habitat: Wild quinine occurs in dry, somewhat heavy soils in prairies, fields, open wooded areas, rocky woods, and hillsides.
©William S. Justice
@ PLANTS
Establishment
Wild quinine is a very hardy addition to the garden as it is tolerant of both hot and cold weather. The plants make a nice addition to native plant gardens because of their wild growth form. Wild quinine plants are easily propagated by seed. Plant seeds in the fall or early winter or pre-treat them with 4 to 6 weeks of cold moist stratification to improve germination. Wild quinine will grow best in fertile, well-drained soils in full-sun to light shade.
Pests and Potential Problems
This plant has no known serious disease or insect problems.
Control
Please contact your local agricultural extension specialist or county weed specialist to learn what works best in your area and how to use it safely. Always read label and safety instructions for each control method. Trade names and control measures appear in this document only to provide specific information. USDA, NRCS does not guarantee or warranty the products and control methods named, and other products may be equally effective.
Cultivars, Improved, and Selected Materials (and area of origin)
These materials are readily available from commercial plant sources. Contact your local Natural Resources Conservation Service (formerly Soil Conservation Service) office for more information. Look in the phone book under ”United States Government.” The Natural Resources Conservation Service will be listed under the subheading “Department of Agriculture.”
References
Chapman, A.W. 1883. Flora of the Southern United States: Flowering plants and ferns. Second Edition. J. Wilson and Son, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 698 pp.
Clinton, J. 2001. Easy living native perennial wildflowers. Native wildflower seed. Parthenium integrifolium. Wild quinine.
http://www.easywildflowers.com/quality/par.inte.htm
(13 June 2001).
Duncan, W. H. and L.E. Foote 1975. Wildflowers of the southeastern United States. University of Georgia Press, Athens, Georgia. 296 pp.

American feverfew, eastern feverfew, eastern parthenium integrifolium, wild quinine

The Catawba and other tribes in the southeastern United States used wild quinine for medicinal and veterinary purposes.  The leaves contain tannin, which is thought to be beneficial for treating burns.  The leaves were mashed into a moist, thick paste, which was then applied as a poultice to burns. Burns were also treated by placing the whole, fresh leaves over the wounded area.  Tea from the boiled roots was used to treat dysentery.  Ashes from burned leaves were used to rub the skin of horses suffering from sore backs.

Parthenium integrifolium flowers make long-lasting additions to cut bouquets.

 This plant may become weedy or invasive in some regions or habitats and may displace desirable vegetation if not properly managed.  Please consult with your local NRCS Field Office, Cooperative Extension Service office, or state natural resource or agricultural department regarding its status and use.  Weed information is also available from the PLANTS Web site.

 General: Sunflower Family (Asteraceae).  Wild quinine is a perennial, herbaceous forb.  Stiff, upright, sometimes hairy stems are single, or branched near the top.  Stems (4-12 dm in height) grow from a swollen tuberous root.  The leaves are ovate to lanceolate with wavy, toothed margins.  Basal leaves are 38 cm long.  Stem leaves are alternate, smaller, and sparsely distributed along the stems.  The long-lasting, somewhat-yarrow-like flower heads are composed of grayish-white, globular, compound flowers that are 4-6 mm wide.  Five, unusually short, ray flowers (1-2mm long) surround the central disk flower corollas, which are 2.5-3 mm long.  Only the ray flowers are fertile.  The heads are grouped together into an inflorescent spray up to 20 cm in diameter.  Flowers have a pleasant but mild medicinal fragrance.  The plant flowers from summer through the autumn months.

  Wild quinine occurs in dry, somewhat heavy soils in prairies, fields, open wooded areas, rocky woods, and hillsides. 

Parthenium integrifolium Wild Quinine (Feverfew) is a very hardy addition to the garden as it is tolerant of both hot and cold weather.  The plants make a nice addition to native plant gardens because of their wild growth form.  Wild quinine plants are easily propagated by seed.  Plant seeds in the fall or early winter or pre-treat them with 4 to 6 weeks of cold moist stratification to improve germination.  Wild quinine will grow best in fertile, well-drained soils in full-sun to light shade. 

 Parthenium integrifolium plants have no known serious disease or insect problems.