Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
Narrowleaf Slender Mountain Mint
Seed & Plant
(pick-NAN-thuh-mon  ten-yoo-ih-FOLE-lee-um)
Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers
Native Wild Flower Plants & Seed for Home Landscaping & Prairie Restoration
john@easywildflowers.com

pycnanthemum tenuifolium picture, narrow leaved mountain mint picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
Pycnanthemum tenuifolium Narrowleaf Slender Mountain Mint flower picture Sun July and August White 12 -24 Dry to Moist 8 to 24 Inches Perennial

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, Narrowleaf Mountainmint Photo by cj      

We have Pycnanthemum tennuifolium (Narrow leaved Mountain Mint) potted plants available, $5.00 each plus Boxing/Shipping.  Please contact us by email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges on  potted plants

For other flowers visit the Wildflower Seed/Plant Price List 
 to order Mountain Mint seed copy the order form
or 
email questions, comments, and orders to john@easywildflowers.com

Pycnanthemum tennuifolium seed
Slender Mountain Mint seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -out at this time

  200

 40 sq ft

1 ounce - ---------

 375,000

9,375 sq ft

1 pound -----------

 

150,000 sq ft

Seed shipping chart at bottom of page
Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
, Narrowleaf Mountainmint or Narrow leaved Slender Mountain Mint is an attractive perennial that will grow in a wide range of conditions. Narrowleaf mountainmint grows best when planted in rich, average to moist soil in full sun in a butterfly garden or prairie meadow with other prairie wildflowers, (coneflowers, black-eyed susans, blazing stars, marsh milkweed, beard-tongues), and prairie grasses, (little bluestem, and sea oats).  Pycnanthemum tenuifolium plants are avoided by deer, the flowers are very attractive to butterflies and are used in flower arrangements.  Slender mountain mint leaves and stems are very fragrant  and make a refreshing mint tea.  Narrowleaf mountainmint seeds germinate without pretreatment.

Native Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, Narrowleaf Mountainmint plants occur naturally in dry or rocky open woods, dry fields,  prairies meadows, alluvial ground, and gravel bars from Georgia to Texas, north to New England, New York, Ontario, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.  Lamiaceae (Mint family)

The map below shows areas where native Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, Narrowleaf Mountain Mint flowers grow wild, it is hardy over a much wider area if planted.  Plant in USDA plant hardiness zones 2 to 9.

Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
Mountain Mint

Alabama
Arkansas
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana

Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina

Ohio
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Vermont
Virginia
West Virginia
Wisconsin

State Distributional Map for Pycananthemum tennuifolium, slender mountain mint wild flower seed

Use the chart below for shipping charges on flower seeds, to order mountain mint seed copy the order form or email questions, comments & orders to john

Please contact us by email with your address for shipping charges & availability on Pycnanthemum tenuifolium, Narrowleaf Mountainmint potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different seeds.
Out of mountain mint seeds at this time

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =    $3.00 shipping
$20.01 - $50.00    =    $4.00 shipping
$50.01-$100.00    =    $5.00 shipping

over $100.00    =    5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
Phone 417-469-2611 

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to - john@easywildflowers.com

Native Pycanthemum tennuifolium slender Mountain Mint plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

Alternative Names
Common Alternate Names:
Virginia thyme
slender mountain mint
common horsemint
Uses
Wildlife Use: Narrowleaf mountainmint provides a nectar source for pollinators and is well suited for use in pollinator restoration. Preliminary observation found that P. tenuifolium attracted 20 different species of Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera in Cape May, New Jersey. The sweat bees Lasioglossum vierecki, Halictus confusus, and Halictus ligatus were most frequently observed visiting the flower. Both Lasioglossum sp. and Halictus confuses in particular are important pollinators of pepper, watermelon, strawberry, and tomato plants.
Robertson (1928) collected 29 species of Lepidoptera from P. tenuifolium in Central Illinois. This is one of the greatest numbers of species to visit a flower from the 244 species of flowering plants in his study. In Tooker et al., (2006), 9 species of fly were found on P. tenuifolium; and Robertson (1929) captured 31 species of fly.
Deer may browse the leaves and a variety of animals will eat the seeds. It is reported that the seeds are too small to attract birds (Hilty, 2012).
Erosion Control: P. tenuifolium spreads quickly through rhizomes and so would make a good soil stabilizer.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g., threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).
Description and Adaptation
Description: P. tenuifolium is a native, warm season, perennial forb that grows 2–3 ft tall and spreads equally wide. It is a member of the Lamiaceae (mint) family and the crushed flowers or leaves emit a minty scent. Like other mints, it has a four angled stem and small opposite leaves. The stem is smooth, without hairs, and is slender and stiff. The plant has a taproot and rhizomes.
The pale green leaves are approximately 0.15–0.6 in wide and 0.5–2 in long. They are smooth or minutely hairy on the uppermost leaves. The upper leaves are stalkless while the lowest leaves have short stems. There are short leafy branches in the axils.
The plant has profuse clusters of small, tubular, white flowers which bloom in the middle of summer; July through August. The flower petals have an upper lip, and three-lobed lower lip. Clusters stagger their bloom period over a long period of time. It is thought that pollinators prefer this species because the florets are tightly clustered, have short corolla tubes, and are white (Tooker et al,. 2002).
Adaptation:P. tenuifolium grows in dry to medium wet soils and in full sun to partial shade. It can be found in rocky ground in open prairies and upland woods, as well as in low areas, wet thickets, pine barrens, oak woods, and on the edges of wooded areas. Gleason and Cronquist (1963) observe that it is found most often in dry soils of upland woods and prairies. For updated distribution, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.
Narrowleaf mountainmint (Pycnanthemum tenuifolium) distribution from USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.
Establishment
P. tenuifolium should be grown in full sun in moist to slightly dry soils. Although seeds are small and difficult to use, it can be propagated by seed. Seeds germinate without pretreatment. It may also be propagated by cuttings or division. Cuttings should be made in June and divisions should be done during dormancy (from late fall to early spring).
Pests and Potential Problems
There are no major pests or problems known for this plant, although it may be vulnerable to rust.
Environmental Concerns
It forms colonies by spreading through rhizomes and can show aggressive growth.

 

Alternate Names
Common Alternate Names:
Virginia thyme
slender mountain mint
common horsemint
Uses
Wildlife Use: Pycnanthemum. tenuifolium provides a nectar source for pollinators and is well suited for use in pollinator restoration habitat. Preliminary observation found that P. tenuifolium attracted 20 different species of Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera in Cape May, New Jersey. The sweat bees Lasioglossum vierecki, Halictus confusus, and Halictus ligatus were most frequently observed visiting the flower. Both Lasioglossum sp. and Halictus confuses in particular are important pollinators of pepper , watermelon, strawberry, and tomato plants.
Robertson (1928) collected 29 species of Lepidoptera from P. tenuifolium in Central Illinois. This is one of the greatest numbers of species to visit a flower from the 244 species of flowering plants in his study. In Tooker et al. (2006), 9 species of fly were found on P. tenuifolium; and Robertson (1929) captured 31 species of fly.
Deer may browse the leaves and a variety of animals will eat the seeds. It is reported that the seeds are too small to attract birds (Hilty, 2012).
Erosion Control: P. tenuifolium spreads quickly through rhizomes and so would make a good soil stabilizer.
Ethnobotany
P. tenuifolium has been used in herbal teas and by many native tribes as a seasoning in food to improve flavor. Members of the genus Pycnanthemum were once referred to as American wild basil; so widespread was its use as a food additive (Austin and Honychurch, 2004).
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g., threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).
Description
General: P. tenuifolium is a native, warm season, perennial forb that grows 2–3 ft tall and spreads equally wide. It is a member of the Lamiaceae (mint) family and the crushed flowers or leaves emit a minty scent. Like other mints, it has a four angled stem and small opposite leaves. The stem is smooth, without hairs, and is slender and stiff. The plant has a taproot and rhizomes.
The pale green leaves are approximately 0.15–0.6 in wide and 0.5–2 in long. They are smooth or minutely hairy on the uppermost leaves. The upper leaves are stalkless while the lowest leaves have short stems. There are short leafy branches in the axils.
The plant has profuse clusters of small, tubular, white flowers which bloom in the middle of summer; July through August. The flower petals have an upper lip, and three-lobed lower lip. Clusters stagger their bloom period over a long period of time. It is thought that pollinators prefer this species because the florets are tightly clustered, have short corolla tubes, and are white (Tooker et al., 2002).
Distribution: The plant grows from Canada south to Florida, west to Texas, and northwest to Minnesota. For current distribution, please consult the Plant
Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Web site.
Habitat: P. tenuifolium grows in dry to medium wet soils and in full sun to partial shade. It is found in rocky ground in open prairies and upland woods, as well as in low areas, wet thickets, pine barrens, oak woods, and on the edges of wooded areas. Gleason and Cronquist (1963) observe that it is most often found in dry soils of upland woods and prairies.
The wetland indicator status of this plant is both facultative (FAC) and facultative wetland (FACW) depending on the region under consideration. Facultative species are equally likely to occur in wetlands as non-wetlands. Facultative wetland plants usually occur in wetlands (estimated probability 67%–99%). Please consult the PLANTS Web site to determine the wetland status for your region.
Establishment
P. tenuifolium should be grown in full sun in moist to slightly dry soils. Although seeds are small and difficult to use, it can be propagated by seed. Seeds germinate without pretreatment. It may also be propagated by cuttings or division. Cuttings should be made in June and divisions should be done during dormancy (from late fall to early spring).
Pests and Potential Problems
There are no major pests or problems known for this plant, although it may be vulnerable to rust.
Environmental Concerns
It forms colonies by spreading through rhizomes and can show aggressive growth.
Seeds and Plant Production
Seeds mature in late September and should be collected when the black seeds can be shaken out of old blooms. The seeds do not have hairs but can still be easily carried by the wind. One ounce of seed contains roughly 375,000- 378,000 seeds. The seeds have low protein content.

Native Pycanthemum tennuifolium slender Mountain Mint plants are easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade.  In optimum conditions Mountain Mint may be a vigorous and sometimes aggressive grower.

Slender Mountain Mint typically grows in the wild in dry, open, rocky woods, dry prairies and fields, along roadsides, along streams and in open wet thickets. Mountain Mint is an erect, many-branched, herbaceous perennial that grows 18 to 36 inches tall with extremely narrow, almost needle-like leaves and profuse terminal clusters of small, white flowers which bloom in mid to late summer. All parts of the plant emit a strong, mint-like aroma when crushed. Pycnanthemums have been used in teas. This native wildflower is found throughout the Midwest and Eastern US.

Native Pycanthemum tennuifolium slender Mountain Mint plant does not have serious insect or disease problems.  It is an interesting plant for the herb garden, border, naturalized area or meadow and may be grown in open areas near ponds and streams