Rudbeckia hirta Black-eyed Susan Seeds
ruhd-BECK-ee-uh  HER-tah
rud-BEK-ee-a                  

Easyliving Native Perennial Wildflowers Native Wildflower Seeds and Potted Plants

for Home Landscaping and Prairie Restoration john@easywildflowers.com  

Rudbeckia hirta Black-eyed Susan flower picture Rudbeckia hirta Black-eyed Susan flower picture Habitat Bloom Period Color Height Inches Moisture Plant Spacing Lifespan
  Rudbeckia hirta picture, black-eyed susan picture Sun to 
Lt Shade
June Yellow with a Dark Center 12 - 30 Dry to Average 8 to 18 Inches Annual 
Biennial
perennial

   Click picture for a larger image.  Photo by cj

For our other native wildflowers visit Wildflower Seed and Potted Plant Price List

 to order copy and mail the order form
or
email questions, comments, and orders to john@easywildflowers.com   

Rudbeckia hirta seed
Black-eyed Susan seed

approximate
number of seeds

approximate coverage
in square feet

1 packet -  $2.50  + shipping

  200

40 sq ft

1 ounce - -$5.00                   

  92,000

2,300 sq ft

1 pound - $40.00                  

  1,472,000

36,800 sq ft

Minimum combined seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different wildflowers. 
Seed shipping chart at bottom of page

Rudbeckia = Named for Olof Rudbeck and his son (also Olof), 17th century Swedish botanists
          hirta = hairy

Rudbeckia hirta, Blackeyed Susan is a familiar roadside daisy growing throughout the eastern United States.  It is a magnet for butterflies in the summer and songbirds will cover the plants in autumn devouring the seeds.  This versatile wildflower can be grown in a container for the patio or naturalized in a prairie meadow with Asclepias (Butterfly Weed), Oenothera (Missouri Primrose),  Echinacea (coneflower), and Native warm season prairie grasses.  black-eyed Susan flowers are beautiful symmetrical circles of deep yellow petals surrounding dark brown central cones.  Rudbeckia hirta can be an annual or short lived perennial depending on local growing conditions and will perform best with adequate moisture but will withstand periods of drought.  It self-seeds easily and can be invasive.  Blackeyed Susan is a host plant for the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly caterpillar.  Seeds germinate without pretreatment.

Uses

Erosion control: Black-eyed Susan is an important component in critical area treatment plantings along with grasses, legumes, and other forbs when used along road cuts, hillsides, and other areas subject to erosion.

 Wildlife: This plant offers protection and food to several song and game birds.

 Recreation and beautification: Black-eyed Susan can be used for landscaping and in wildflower gardens.

 Description

Rudbeckia hirta L., black-eyed Susan, is a biennial forb about 1 m tall with yellow ray flowers and dark brown spherical centers.  After germination, the seedling grows into a rosette with oblong leaves.  Sometimes flower stalks will appear in the first summer, but typically black-eyed Susan blooms from June to September of the second year.  After flowering and seed maturation, the plants die.  The seed is very small (1,746,000 per pound) and black, about 2 mm long and 0.5 mm in diameter.

 Adaptation and Distribution

Black-eyed Susan is naturalized in most of the states east of Kansas and the bordering areas of Canada.  It is adapted throughout the Northeast on soils with a drainage classification range from well-drained to somewhat poorly drained.  It will perform acceptably on droughty soils during years with average or above rainfall, but best growth is achieved on sandy, well drained sites.  It is winter hardy in areas where low temperatures are between -30 ° and -20 °F.

 Establishment

Black-eyed Susan is easily established with most critical area seeding techniques.  Generally ˝ lb. of seed per acre is sufficient in mixes with conservation grasses, legumes, and other forbs.  Where the intent is to maximize the impact of the forb component, utilize bunchgrasses rather than aggressively spreading grasses such as reed canarygrass or bromegrass.  Once established, new seedlings will be produced from the preceding crop; the stand may perpetuate itself indefinitely.

 Management

After establishment, competing perennial vegetation should be controlled through the use of mechanical or chemical practices.  If competing vegetation is not controlled, one will observe a decrease in the number of black-eyed Susan plants.

 Pests and Potential Problems

There are no major insect or disease pests of black-eyed Susan.  Stands can be reduced by powdery mildew and damping-off organisms.

Black-eyed Susan plants occurs naturally in prairies, savannas, rocky open woods, old fields, and along roadsides from Newfoundland to British Columbia, south to Florida and New Mexico.   Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Rudbeckia hirta var. hirta occurs from Pennsylvania to Georgia and sparingly north to Maine and west to Illinois.  

Rudbeckia hirta var. angustifolia is in the South.  

Rudbeckia hirta var. brittonii is found in the southeastern United States.  

Rudbeckia hirta var. floridana is found in central Florida.  

Rudbeckia hirta var. pulcherrima is widespread, especially in disturbed habitats

The map below shows areas where native Rudbeckia hirta, Blackeyed Susan flowers grow wild.

Rudbeckia hirta
Black-eyed Susan

Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland

Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Distributional Map for Rudbeckia hirta black-eyed susan wild flower seed

Alabama
Arkansas
California

Use the chart below for shipping charges on native wildflower seeds Rudbeckia hirta, Blackeyed Susan flower seeds

to order copy and mail the order form
or
 email questions, comments and orders to john@easywildflowers.com 

email with your zip code and number of plants for shipping charges and availability on potted plants

We accept payment by check, money order, and through Paypal

The minimum seed order amount is $10, this can be a combination of different wildflower seeds.
 

subtotal for flower seeds 

shipping charge for seeds

seed orders up to  $20.00    =  

 $4.00 shipping

$20.01 - $50.00    =  

 $6.00 shipping

$50.01-$100.00    =  

 $7.50 shipping

over $100.00    =    7.5 % of subtotal

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Easyliving Wildflowers
PO Box  522
Willow Springs,  MO.  65793
USA
Phone 417-469-2611 

We accept payment by check or money order and through PayPal

e-mail questions, comments, and orders to  john@easywildflowers.com

Rudbeckia hirta, Blackeyed Susan Plant distribution map complements of USDA, NRCS. 2001. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.1
  (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uses
Erosion control: Black-eyed Susan is an important component in critical area treatment plantings along with grasses, legumes, and other forbs when used along road cuts, hillsides, and other areas subject to erosion.
Wildlife: This plant offers protection and food to several song and game birds.
Recreation and beautification: Black-eyed Susan can be used for landscaping and in wildflower gardens.
Status
Please consult the PLANTS Web site and your State Department of Natural Resources for this plant’s current status (e.g. threatened or endangered species, state noxious status, and wetland indicator values).
Description
Rudbeckia hirta L., black-eyed Susan, is a biennial forb about 1 m tall with yellow ray flowers and dark brown spherical centers. After germination, the seedling grows into a rosette with oblong leaves. Sometimes flower stalks will appear in the first summer, but typically black-eyed Susan blooms from June to September of the second year. After flowering and seed maturation, the plants die. The seed is very small (1,746,000 per pound) and black, about 2 mm long and 0.5 mm in diameter.
Adaptation and Distribution
Black-eyed Susan is naturalized in most of the states east of Kansas and the bordering areas of Canada. It is adapted throughout the Northeast on soils with a drainage classification range from well-drained to somewhat poorly drained. It will perform acceptably on droughty soils during years with average or above rainfall, but best growth is achieved on sandy, well drained sites. It is winter hardy in areas where low temperatures are between -30 ° and -20 °F.
For a current distribution map, please consult the Plant Profile page for this species on the PLANTS Website.
Establishment
Black-eyed Susan is easily established with most critical area seeding techniques. Generally ˝ lb. of seed per acre is sufficient in mixes with conservation grasses, legumes, and other forbs. Where the intent is to maximize the impact of the forb component, utilize bunchgrasses rather than aggressively spreading grasses such as reed canarygrass or bromegrass. Once established, new seedlings will be produced from the preceding crop; the stand may perpetuate itself indefinitely.
Management
After establishment, competing perennial vegetation should be controlled through the use of mechanical or chemical practices. If competing vegetation is not controlled, one will observe a decrease in the number of black-eyed Susan plants.
Pests and Potential Problems
There are no major insect or disease pests of black-eyed Susan. Stands can be reduced by powdery mildew and damping-off organisms.
Cultivars, Improved, and Selected Materials (and area of origin)
'Golden Jubilee' black-eyed Susan was released by the Big Flats Plant Materials Center in 1985. It is typical of the species except slightly shorter in height with a longer bloom period. It was not selected for its flower size or color. 'Golden Jubilee' is the only cultivar of black-eyed Susan that has proven adaptation throughout the Northeast for conservation
USDA NRCS National Plant Materials Center
Beltsville, MD
use. The original collection area of 'Golden Jubilee' was near Manchester, Vermont. Foundation seed is distributed to commercial producers by the Big Flats PMC in Corning, NY. Black-eyed Susan is re